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Giacometti´s Litography, a new important Geiger Foundation exhibition

18/12/2018

by Gianpaolo Ansalone


From 1st December to 24th February, in Cecina “Paris sans fin”

Typical Parisian boulevards, cafés, large monuments, scenes and daily actions. These are the images in the one hundred and fifty lithographs by Alberto Giacometti, which make up “Paris sans fin”, the wonderful work considered the artistic will of the famous Swiss sculptor and painter. Today, these precious works made by Giacometti with the rapidity of a lithographic pencil can be admired in Italy thanks to the Herman Geiger Cultural Foundation which presents the exhibition “Paris sans fin. Original lithographs by Alberto Giacometti” on its premises in Cecina (no. 32 piazza Guerrazzi). Curated by Klaus Littmann, the exhibition can be seen from Saturday, 1st December (inauguration at 5.00pm) to Sunday, 24th February, every day from 4.00pm to 8.00pm, free entrance. Along with these works there is also a selection of photographs by Ernst Scheidegger who documented the work of his artist friend for over two decades. The exhibits come from the collection belonging to Carlos Gross who owns one of the major collections of lithographs by Giacometti internationally. After the Italian lap, the exhibition will move to Austria and the States. The visitor will not only be able to closely observe the single lithographs which make up this marvelous graphic poem but also enjoy a global vision of a work that is unique in its genre, rendering both Giacometti’s mastery and his love for Paris tangible. “Paris sans fin” is indeed a “journey” through the French capital, captured through a personal and subjective look which tries to detach itself from the nearly obsessive routine of the atelier, the familiar models, the extremely long posing sessions and the incessantly modified, undone, restarted work. “Paris sans fin” was born from the initiative of his editor friend, Tériade. Giacometti, at first enthusiastic at the idea of this kind of reportage, found it difficult to carry out: the complexity of the project, the strain of having to go out and draw from real life and his unstable health brought about long interruptions of a work which was done from 1958 to 1965. The pictures should have come with a text but Giacometti was not able to complete it and it was included albeit unfinished. The work was published posthumous in 1969 with only 250 pieces.